Difference between revisions of "Kysylew AB Nativity of the Holy Virgin Russo Orthodox Church 1898"

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This new Temple is a large, wood-frame Temple built on a cruciform plan in the Byzantine tradition featuring 2 large and 3 smaller onion-shaped domes, each capped with metal tri-bar Orthodox Crosses.  It is constructed over a basement which is used for social gatherings and meetings.  It is correctly oriented, with the main door at the west end (which means that the main, western, door does not face the road).  This Temple presents a distinctive and impressive silhouette as a highly visible symbol of the continuity of the Orthodox Faith in the district.  This has been the case, including the first Temple, for more than 100 years.   
 
This new Temple is a large, wood-frame Temple built on a cruciform plan in the Byzantine tradition featuring 2 large and 3 smaller onion-shaped domes, each capped with metal tri-bar Orthodox Crosses.  It is constructed over a basement which is used for social gatherings and meetings.  It is correctly oriented, with the main door at the west end (which means that the main, western, door does not face the road).  This Temple presents a distinctive and impressive silhouette as a highly visible symbol of the continuity of the Orthodox Faith in the district.  This has been the case, including the first Temple, for more than 100 years.   
  
The Nativity of the Holy Virgin Orthodox Temple at Kysylew is architecturally significant as the last and the largest wood-frame church built in [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamont_County Lamont County] that was rooted in the [https://www.britannica.com/art/Byzantine-architecture Byzantine architectural tradition] as it evolved in [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Canada western Canada].  The Temple has an elaborate and sophisticated [http://www.dictionary.com/browse/cruciform cruciform] plan.  Above the nave at the crossing with the transepts is a large, open, octagonal drum-like structure, above which is a large, open, onion-shaped dome or [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupola cupola].  The cupola terminates in a small ball, which is surmounted by with a metal tri-bar Cross which is typical amongst the Russian and Ukrainian Orthodox.  The sanctuary (Holy Place, Altar) is contained in an [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apse apse] at the eastern end, over which there is an octagonal drum, cupola and Cross, smaller than that on the main cupola.  This apsidal section is flanked by a sacristy on the south side.  The Temple incorporates a distinct narthex extension at the west end of the building.  Above this which is surmounted by a domed belfry over the western entrance (narthex) complete with blind round windows and louvered openings and capped by a cupola with a metal 3-bar Orthodox Cross.  This feature is similar to that of the Dormition Temple in Shandro, and to the Temple of Saints Peter and Paul in Dickie Bush.  Twin towers with octagonal drums (complete with applique window treatment), also crowned by onion-shaped domes, which each terminate in a ball surmounted by a metal tri-bar Orthodox Cross, flank the rear sides of the narthex extension-cum-bell-tower.  The whole Temple structure presents a complex roof line comprised of gable and hip elements unified by consistent eave lines creating a harmonious whole design.  The fenestration patterns are  notable.  There are the the large arched single-hung windows with segments of patterned pressed glass that form the shape of a Cross, and there are round, segmented windows with coloured pressed glass.   
+
The Nativity of the Holy Virgin Orthodox Temple at Kysylew is architecturally significant as the last and the largest wood-frame church built in [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamont_County Lamont County] that was rooted in the [https://www.britannica.com/art/Byzantine-architecture Byzantine architectural tradition] as it evolved in [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Canada western Canada].  The Temple has an elaborate and sophisticated [http://www.dictionary.com/browse/cruciform cruciform] plan.  Above the nave at the crossing with the transepts is a large, open, octagonal drum-like structure, above which is a large, open, onion-shaped dome or [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupola cupola].  The cupola terminates in a small ball, which is surmounted by with a metal tri-bar Cross which is typical amongst the Russian and Ukrainian Orthodox.  The sanctuary (Holy Place, Altar) is contained in an [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apse apse] at the eastern end, over which there is an octagonal drum, cupola and Cross, smaller than that on the main cupola.  This apsidal section is flanked by a sacristy on the south side.  The Temple incorporates a distinct narthex extension at the west end of the building.  This square section provides 3 levels.  The lowest is the entry/vestibule (narthex).  Above this is the place for the choir.  Above the choir setion is domed belfry, complete with blind round windows and louvered openings.  This is all capped by a cupola with a metal 3-bar Cross.  This feature is similar to that of the [[Shandro AB Holy Assumption (Dormition) Russo Orthodox Church and Cemetery 1899 |Dormition Temple in Shandro]], and to the [[Dickie Bush AB Saints Peter and Paul Russo Orthodox Church and Cemetery 1906, 1909 |Temple of Saints Peter and Paul in Dickie Bush]]On the the rear sides of the narthex extension-cum-bell-tower are twin towers.  Each has an octagonal drum (complete with appliqué window treatment), above which is a small onion-shaped dome upon which is a ball surmounted by a metal tri-bar Cross.  The whole Temple structure presents a complex roof line comprised of gable and hip elements unified by consistent eave lines creating a harmonious whole design.  The fenestration patterns are  notable.  There are the the large arched single-hung windows with segments of patterned pressed glass that form the shape of a Cross, and there are round, segmented windows with coloured pressed glass.   
  
  

Revision as of 15:04, 22 November 2017

Kysylew Nativity of the Theotokos Church.jpg


Kysylew, AB, Nativity of the Holy Virgin Russo Orthodox Church, 1898, 1905


Kysylew may be spelt Kisilevo, Kyseliv, Kitsman.


Prehistory

Kysylew, Alberta, is found approximately 5 km (3 mi) northwest of Andrew, Alberta. Kysylew is a Polonised mis-spelling of Kyseliv, which is near Kitsman in Kitsman County (raion) of the Chernivtsi Oblast (province) in the region of North Bukovina. As is the case with most other parishes in this region of Alberta, the place-name indicates the place of origin of the majority of pioneer settlers who immigrated to Canada and settled near this site, beginning before the turn of the 20th century.

Kysylew is also sometimes referred to as “Whitford”. However, Whitford is on the east side of Whitford Lake and beyond the present village of Andrew, to the east, whereas Kysylew is somewhat northwest of Andrew. The settlement of Kysylew, as with Sachava, pre-dated the establishment of the village of Andrew.

Founding the parish

The parish of the Nativity of the Holy Virgin at Kysylew was founded in 1898 by those who had just arrived in this area of the Northwest Territories from what was at that time a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Immediately, while the people began to clear the land and build their first temporary shelters, they began to gather regularly in order to pray together. At this same time, the first missionary priests were arriving from Seattle, Washington, and the first Divine Liturgy was being served at Stary Wostok. As in other places in this region, the people began to prepare for the construction of a Temple in which they could worship the Lord as they had done before in their homeland. They first secured a 16-hectare (40 acres) site on which they would construct a Temple, and also have a cemetery. This site also has landmark value in modern times because of its association with the route of the South Victoria Trail. This trail was surveyed by the government in 1896, and it crossed Egg Creek via a small bridge a short distance north of the present crossing. (Although the plan for the trail was cancelled in 1922, the landscape has remained largely unchanged and it still includes a trail running east over a wooden bridge that leads to the cemetery on the west side of Egg Creek.) After 2 years of labour, by 1902, the Temple had been constructed from logs by the faithful people and the work was completed. In that year, the community was incorporated legally. The Temple was formally dedicated to the Nativity of the Theotokos by the priests of the Russian Orthodox Mission who served this community. Then, in 1905, Bishop Tikhon (Belavin) arrived and he sanctified this Temple, and he also sanctified other Temples in the region.

Church bells were donated to the congregation in 1911, and an extension to the Temple building was constructed in 1921. This Temple served the faithful until the late 1940s.

In the same manner as almost all other rural parishes in Western Canada, this parish also began to suffer from the rural depopulation that began in the 1930s and steadily increased after World War II.

In 1949, the original log Temple was destroyed by fire. Immediately, the faithful people decided to rebuild.

Second Temple

In 1950, the congregation embarked on a construction project that would soon become the Temple which stands today. With a more elaborate cruciform structure, the new Temple was erected approximately 30 m (100 ft) to the east of the original building.

The carpenter who led the building was John (Ivan) Mnoholinity (1890-1962). The Temple building is an important example of his later work. He was a well-known and highly skilled church builder, who built more than 20 churches across Canada.

This new Temple is a large, wood-frame Temple built on a cruciform plan in the Byzantine tradition featuring 2 large and 3 smaller onion-shaped domes, each capped with metal tri-bar Orthodox Crosses. It is constructed over a basement which is used for social gatherings and meetings. It is correctly oriented, with the main door at the west end (which means that the main, western, door does not face the road). This Temple presents a distinctive and impressive silhouette as a highly visible symbol of the continuity of the Orthodox Faith in the district. This has been the case, including the first Temple, for more than 100 years.

The Nativity of the Holy Virgin Orthodox Temple at Kysylew is architecturally significant as the last and the largest wood-frame church built in Lamont County that was rooted in the Byzantine architectural tradition as it evolved in western Canada. The Temple has an elaborate and sophisticated cruciform plan. Above the nave at the crossing with the transepts is a large, open, octagonal drum-like structure, above which is a large, open, onion-shaped dome or cupola. The cupola terminates in a small ball, which is surmounted by with a metal tri-bar Cross which is typical amongst the Russian and Ukrainian Orthodox. The sanctuary (Holy Place, Altar) is contained in an apse at the eastern end, over which there is an octagonal drum, cupola and Cross, smaller than that on the main cupola. This apsidal section is flanked by a sacristy on the south side. The Temple incorporates a distinct narthex extension at the west end of the building. This square section provides 3 levels. The lowest is the entry/vestibule (narthex). Above this is the place for the choir. Above the choir setion is domed belfry, complete with blind round windows and louvered openings. This is all capped by a cupola with a metal 3-bar Cross. This feature is similar to that of the Dormition Temple in Shandro, and to the Temple of Saints Peter and Paul in Dickie Bush. On the the rear sides of the narthex extension-cum-bell-tower are twin towers. Each has an octagonal drum (complete with appliqué window treatment), above which is a small onion-shaped dome upon which is a ball surmounted by a metal tri-bar Cross. The whole Temple structure presents a complex roof line comprised of gable and hip elements unified by consistent eave lines creating a harmonious whole design. The fenestration patterns are notable. There are the the large arched single-hung windows with segments of patterned pressed glass that form the shape of a Cross, and there are round, segmented windows with coloured pressed glass.


Kysylew interior.jpg Kysylew Nativity of the Theotokos Church interior.jpg Temple interior


The configuration of the interior of the Temple includes the nave, the transepts, and the Holy Place (sanctuary) which separated from the nave by an iconostas. Over the Holy Place and transepts are vaulted ceilings and there is the remarkable open dome together with its penditives above the nave. Over the narthex is the choir-loft, which has access through the domed tower on its northwest corner. Laminated plywood panelling is now on the walls and ceilings and the dome, and there are original mouldings, door and window wood trim if note. There are many original liturgical items. This includes the various decorative elements in the Temple. The chief of these is the wooden tri-partite iconostas (including its Royal Doors), which has carved panels that enclose the iconographic works executed by Father John Wasil, who served in many of the parishes in this region.

The work of Father John Wasil, who painted most of the icons in this Temple, is representative of the continuing post-World War II tradition of religious art in Eastern Rite churches in Alberta. The icon of Saint Nicholas is noteworthy for its inscription in both Old Church Slavonic and Hungarian.

The Temple’s exterior also has distinct and unique features. The first to be seen is the trail which runs to the northwest over a wooden bridge in the direction of the second feature. This is the cemetery on the west side of Egg Creek.

Father Wasyl and Matushka Wasylyna Ostashek served in this parish for very many years. The community has consistently demonstrated warm hospitality to visitors, and it has remained an active contributor to the life of the Orthodox Christian Church in this region.

After Father Wasyl’s retirement and repose, the parish began to participate in one of the 2 parish groupings that had begun to develop in 1990s. In doing so, the parishes supported each other in being able to support a priest who would serve them.

In 1978, a stone monument was erected, on which the parish is called “Canadian Orthodox Church”.


CEM2543650 1421273802.jpg Monument


In 2001, at the conclusion of the Archdiocesan Assembly Meeting in Edmonton, Alberta, buses of representatives and clergy visited various historical rural parishes, including the Temple of the Nativity of the Holy Virgin at Kysylew. The parishioners warmly greeted their guests. At each stop, the visitors learnt a considerable amount about the history of our Orthodox Church in Canada.


Kysylew Nativity of the Theotokos Church from the cemetery S.jpg The Temple viewed from the cemetery


Kysylew Nativity of the Holy Virgin Cemetery, 1899


The cemetery is located at the Land Description Site NE 07 57 16 W4, northwest of Andrew, Alberta. To the west of the Temple, there is a road that crosses Egg Creek, to where the cemetery is located.


Kysylew Nativity of the Holy Virigin Cemetery Yard 2S.jpg CEM2543650 1426729037.jpg Views of the cemetery



The services are in the English and Slavonic languages.

This parish follows the Old (Julian) Calendar.

The Altar Feast-day of the Temple is the Feast of the Nativity of the Theotokos, 21/8 September.

In 2017, the priest of this parish is the Archimandrite Gerasim (Power).


Directions :

The Nativity of the Holy Virgin Church Temple at Kysylew, Alberta, is found approximately 5 km northwest of Andrew, Alberta. It is located about 2 km west of Andrew on Highway #45, and then about 2 km north.

From Edmonton, Andrew/Kysylew is located about 120 km (73 mi) northeast of Edmonton. Drive west from Edmonton on Highway #16 (Yellowhead) until Mundare. Turn left (north) on Highway #855. Drive through Andrew to the junction with Highway #45. Turn left (west). Drive about 2 km to Range Road #165, and turn right (north) and drive to the Temple, which is highly visible on the left.

The Temple is found at Land Description Site NE 7-57-16-W4.


Mailing address :

Nativity of the Holy Virgin Russo Orthodox Church

Box 361

Andrew, Alberta

T0B 0C0


Please contact the priest about service times and dates.

Archimandrite Gerasim (Power)

PO Box 691

Smoky Lake, Alberta

T0A 3C0

Telephone : 780-656-3828

E-mail : vrevpower@hotmail.com


Nativity of the Theotokos Temple S.jpg


References :

Lamont County Research file : The Nativity of the Holy Virgin Orthodox Church of Kysylew.

Archdiocese of Canada — Orthodox Church in America, “The Orthodox Church in Canada : A Chronology” (Ottawa : Archdiocese of Canada, 1988).

First Churches

Lamont County Churches


Additional information :

Archdiocese listing

OCA listing

Orthodox World listing

‘Assembly pilgrims visit heritage churches’ in “Canadian Orthodox Messenger” (Autumn, 2001), pp. 7-8.

Historic Places listing

Alberta historical places

Kysylew School District #1467 (1906-1947) records

Find a grave

Photo

Place names

Cemetery names

Lamont County churches

Article

National Geographic photo